ABOUT US

Beats Exposed is an interactive performance experience that breaks down the barrier between audience and performer. By exposing the body’s vital signs, the performer invites the audience to see beyond the polished act and into the extreme physical and personal effort.

Beats Exposed is built to be used in performance on, or off, stage. It is lightweight and battery powered, and therefore able to run in a variety of settings.

The current iteration of the project is performed with an aerialist. It exposes the exertion in an artform that is extremely demanding, yet typically meant to appear effortless.

HOW IT WORKS


In this experience, the performer wears a Polar pulse sensor and Moteino wireless transceiver while performing. The transceiver communicates wirelessly with a second Moteino transceiver connected to a computer. The pulse is transferred serially to a P5 program with both audio and visualizations.

The audience hears the sound of a heartbeat timed with the performer’s pulse. The visualization, also reacting to the pulse, projects from the ceiling onto the performer, surrounding area, and any audience members that have come in close.

WHO WE ARE

Beats Exposed is a collaboration between a lighting designer and two aerialists with backgrounds including work in the circus and on Broadway.  

DANIELLE BUTLER

Danielle explores where performance and technology meet.  Drawing on a background of circus performance and creative story telling Danielle is currently filling her tool bag at the Interactive Telecommunication Program.

LISA JAMHOURY

Lisa is trapped in a bizarre love triangle with movement and technology. She’s excited to be exploring an open relationship with the two as a graduate student at New York University’s Interactive Telecommunications Program. 

AARON PARSEKIAN

Aaron has been professionally creating with lighting and electronics for the past decade. From working on LED lighting in television sets, broadway shows, and Disney productions, to driving forklifts for Oprah Winfrey, to restoring 35-year-old electronic sculptures, Aaron has always found himself challenged in new and exciting ways while working with novel lighting technology for the arts.